Consumer Information

Update On Playstation Network Breach

It appears that Playstation Network and Qriocity users can breathe more easily when it comes to their credit card information.

Sony has stated that a vital piece of information related to purchases, the card security code, was NOT stored or archived by their system.

This code, which is usually three or four digits long, is used to confirm purchases online and by phone. It is printed on the back on Visa and Mastercard credit cards, next to the signature strip, and in the front of many American Express cards, just above the credit card number.

This card verification code expires with the credit card and another code is issued whenever new cards are sent out. So if the credit card you used on the above mentioned networks was about to expire, you should have no problem.

Furthermore, with the introduction of chip cards and services like Visa‘s Verified by Visa and Mastercard‘s Securecode services, information gathered from the security breach would not likely be useable. But I would definately advise vigilance in regards to purchases, just in case.

Canada’s major credit card companies had adopted Zero Liability programs years back for unauthorized purchases so i’m guessing the issue wont cause many problems, though it should be noted that Sony will NOT be asking people to provide personal or credit card information via email or by phone.

BTW, Sony has stated that some of the services will be reactivated this week and some of their users will be eligible for a free month of Playstation Plus. Details can be found on their official blog.

Privacy Commissioner Investigating Breach

A representative of Canada’s privacy commissioner has told Postmedia News that it is investigating this month’s Playstation Network/Qriocity security breach.

The security breach has caused additional headaches for Sony in California, where a class action lawsuit was filed on Wednesday over this issue.

Myspace For Sale / Delicious Sold

The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that News Corp. is hoping to sell Myspace for $100 million.

According to the paper, three potential buyers are interested in the social networking site : private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners, Redscout Ventures and Bebo owner Criterion Capital Partners.

Meanwhile Yahoo has managed to sell Delicious, its bookmarking service, to Youtube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen Yesterday for an undisclosed amount.

Another Security Breach

WARNING – Playstation Network users should change their passwords and security questions as soon as possible !

An unknown number of user accounts have been breached from April 17th and April 19th, 2011 according to Sony, allowing intruders access to personal information.

This information includes profile information (names, addresses), purchase history, password and security question information.

PlayStation Network and Qriocity services are currently offline as a security firm investigates the security breaches. And Sony advises users that they will never ask for credit card number, social security number or other personally identifiable information by email or phone.

Google Videos Moving To Youtube

According to a recent blog entry, Google is moving their video content to Youtube.

This means people who have uploaded content to Google will be given an option to download this content durring the migration, as well as information on how to migrate this content to Youtube.

The previously published deadline, which was April 29th, 2011, has been reversed and the content will remain accessible for the time being.

IMSLP Attacked By UK Music Publishers

The International Music Score Library Project was knocked offline temporarily this week by a DMCA complaint by the Music Publisher’s Association (UK).

Appearently they had attempted to impose EU copyright laws on this Canadian site because the IMSLP had published Sergei Rachmaninoff‘s “The Bells, Op.35“, a score that is considered public domain in Canada and the United States.

This score had been originally published prior to 1923 and in countries where copyright is limited to 50 years after the death of the composer the material is public domain. In 1993 the European Union had adopted a term of 70 years instead of 50, resulting in a complaint in regards to this specific composition.

This incident has resulted in alot of discussions online in regards to Canada’s attempts to reform copyright and our conformity to international law.

Many Canadians are concerned that the European Union’s music publishers are attempting to impose their terms in Canada, the IMSLP having been previously subjected to a takedown in October 2007 by European classical music publishing firm Universal Edition over numerous compositions. And Canada is currently in talks with the European Union in regards to a free-trade pact, which includes discussions on intellectual property.