Music Industry

CRTC Denies Bell’s Bid To Purchase Astral

The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission has denied Bell Canada’s $3.4 billion takeover of media giant Astral.

Bell had planned to acquire them in order to provide content through their networks and internet services. But there was some concern in regards to access to this content by the competition.

Though some believe Bell may shelf their plan to offer a Netflix type service because of this decision, I believe they will eventually offer this service to compete with Shaw Go, a service offered by Shaw Communications.

Bell Canada has stated they will contest the decision by requesting “the federal cabinet to direct the CRTC to actually follow its own in-place policy”. But they have since been advised that the Federal Court of Appeal may be their only legal recourse.

Congratulations Rush !

Rush has been nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013. And fans have been asked to vote this year !

I’ve voted for Rush and Heart, of course. And when I did Rush was in the lead whilst Heart was at the third position.

Click Here To Cast Your Vote Before December 5th, 2012

Rush

Neil Young’s New Music Service

Neil Young discussed the new Pono music service and device on David Letterman last night.

This service, which is scheduled to launch next year, will offer higher quality recordings and high resolution conversions from analogue recordings.

The Pono device will also play the current music formats and though Warner Music Group is the only label to have signed onto the project at this time, many other labels have shown some interest.

Neil Young’s memoirs, entitled “Waging Heavy Peace”, is available from Amazon.ca and Indigo. And Neil Young & Crazy Horse are currently on tour in Canada.

Your Last Chance To Save & Win

You can save 30% on e-Books from Kobo Books Canadaicon and possibly win a Kobo Gloicon or Kobo Miniicon. But this offer and contest ends on September 27th, 2012.

My e-Book recommendations :

Kobo Canada

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

The Copyright Modernization Act passed through the legislative process and obtained royal assent in June of this year. And though I am critical of the technological protection measure provisions, the bill is still a step forward. But it appears that the lobbyists in the United States are attempting to reverse many of the provisions in this legislation through the Trans Pacific Partnership trade negotiations.

The International Intellectual Property Alliance want to circumvent our democratic processes in order to force our government to enact RIAA style prosecutions in Canada.

They are demanding new penalties for intellectual property violations, new processes in which internet providers are forced to police the internet on their behalf and the removal of the $5000 liability cap on non-commercial infringement.

But their demands don’t end there.

They want an extension of the copyright term up to the American standard and want our customs officers to search people for copyright violations upon entry, without a search warrant.

At the moment copyright is limited to life plus 50 years, meaning an author will own his works up to his death and his estate would retain copyright on these works for 50 years after the author’s death.

The Americans extended their copyright term to life plus 70 years and added additional provisions to their Copyright Act extending copyright on published works to 95 years from publication, which could be renewed resulting in a term of 120 years in some instances.

So, not only do they want to practically eliminate our public domain
but they also want us to be burdened with longer lines at our airports and border crossings so searches can be performed on laptop hard drives and media players.

These amendments were ineffective in the United States, having failed to prevent 96.68 million BitTorrent downloads in the first half of 2012 according to the Musicmetric Digital Music Index, so why would they work in Canada ?

He Said It, He Did It

Sam Sniderman, the founder of Sam The Record Man, has died at the age of 92.

The Sam The Record Man chain was founded in 1937 and had become Canada’s largest chain of record stores by 1982, which enabled the chain to be a major promoter of Canadian music.

In 1961, their flagship store at 347 Yonge Street in Toronto opened and had become a landmark due to its pair of rotating neon signs, which were prominently featured in film and television including Marvel’s “The Incredible Hulk” and one of my favorite music videos, Alphaville’s “Big In Japan”.

Unfortunately, the chain and flagship store closed by mid 2007 due to competition and advancements in music distribution technology. But Sam The Record Man will be remembered for his contributions to the Canadian music industry, including the independent scene, which flourished in the 80’s and 90’s because of his support.

Sam The Record Man RIP 1920-2012