Music Industry

New Law Proposed In Ontario

In case you missed it yesterday, the Government of Ontario has proposed new regulations in regards to the resale of concert and event tickets within the province.

As stipulated in an official June 26th press release, the proposed measures include:

  • Banning the use and sale of ticket-buying software – also known as ticket bots – that are used to block legitimate fans and scoop up the best seats the moment an event goes on sale
  • Forbidding the sale of tickets on the resale market that are not owned or possessed by the seller (i.e. speculative tickets)
  • Continuing to restrict the resale of tickets unless they are verified by the primary seller, or the reseller offers a money-back guarantee.

Also included in the proposed measures are new rules in regards to transparency:

  • Primary ticket sellers would be required to disclose the number of tickets that would be available through the general on-sale, as well as the capacity of the event
  • Ticket resellers and online resale platforms would be required to disclose the original face value of the ticket and precise seat location, as well as the identity of a commercial reseller
  • All ticket-selling businesses would be required to disclose the all-in price of a ticket up front, plus clearly indicate the currency.

The “Ticket Sales Act” will be introduced to the Provincial Parliament in the fall.

Ontario Wants Help To Curtail Ticket Bots

The provincial government of Ontario is now consulting the public in regards to ticket bots.

“Ticket bots” enable companies and individuals to purchase large numbers of tickets to popular events almost instantaneously, requiring many regular consumers to pay significant more to see their favourite team, musical act or theatrical performance, as seen on CBC’s Marketplace.

A survey can be found by clicking here until March 15th, 2017.

Sunrise Records To Expand

Ontario music retailer Sunrise Records is planning on expanding into several former HMV locations through-out Canada this spring.

This chain’s nine stores are currently located in the province of Ontario and the company has been negotiating to take over 70 former HMV locations according to the Globe and Mail.

Unfortunately this will not include the flagship store at the corner of Yonge and Dundas in Toronto and several key street level locations in Canada. But the retailer is hoping to become profitable in 2018 regardless of their inability to secure these locations.

Goodbye HMV Canada

HMV Canada is closing all of its over 100 retail locations and everything is being sold at 30% off original ticket price at these stores.

They will be closing these stores by April 30th, 2017, permanently.

Sad News For Vinyl Fans

Canada Boy Vinyl has closed their manufacturing plant in Calgary after only sixteen months of operations.

This plant had just opened in September 2015 and had expected to take advantage of a resurgence in vinyl’s popularity. But there weren’t enough orders to make the plant sustainable so Dean Reid, the founder and chief operating officer of Canada Boy Vinyl, decided to cease its operations.

Burlington, Ontario’s new Precision Record Pressing plant is now the only vinyl pressing facility in Canada.

Hopefully sales will grow to make a domestic industry in Canada viable.

Tales From Much Music

From August 31st, 1984 to the late 1990’s, Much Music was truly Canada’s Music Station.

In its heyday this 24 hour television channel featured music videos from both major and independent labels, interviews with both popular and new artists, and live performances from multiple genres. And it introduced Canadians to both domestic and foreign performers and songwriters, causing the relatively new Canadian music industry to flourish and gain international notoriety.

Written by songwriter and former VJ Christopher Ward, “Is This Live ?” chronicles this network’s early history through excerpts of interviews with former Much Music staff members, on air personalities and popular recording artists from that period.

Christopher Ward had been one of the first VJs on Much Music and was a regular host on the channel until the late 80’s, occasionally hosting programs on the channel though-out the early 90’s, so i’d say this book qualifies as being the most definitive account of the stations early history.

As an avid watcher, I had always been curious about some of the finer details that were not included in the newspaper and magazine articles I had read on Much Music and Musique Plus’ history. And I believe this book pretty much covers it all, with a few extras about some of the station’s most popular Canadian music videos.

I highly recommend this book. And yes, it is available in hardcover and in digital format from Amazon.ca, Amazon.com, chapters.indigo.ca and iTunes Canada.