Having incurred a loss of 100 million in the previous three months, Canada Post is thinking about introducing community boxes to more neighbourhoods where door to door home deliveries are the norm.

Though mostly attributed to equipment upgrades, this loss has resulted in a public consultation in regards to what measures can be taken to address the reduction of letter mail, which was once the corporation`s bread and butter before the internet.

E-mails and paperless billing have pretty much eliminated the need for  weekday letter deliveries for most people in the larger cities of Canada. But there remains a need for parcel deliveries, especially during the Christmas season.

Personally I’ve had very few problems with my community mailbox, other than the rare lock freezing in January and February. But I can see why some people would like to keep their home delivery.

The handicapped and seniors probably prefer to have their mail delivered so they don’t need to go out in bad weather and risk heat stroke, frostbites and injuries related to falls or smog.

I’m guessing these people will probably be eligible for a compassionate exemption programme and will keep getting their mail delivered at their door. But I think community mailboxes should work for most.

In regards to a reduction in letter mail deliveries, Canada Post had stated last February to the Canadian Press that it would continue deliveries weekdays, regardless of the rumours in the press that these would be reduced from five to three deliveries a week.

Whether they choose to reduce their letter deliveries or not  it makes sense for them to keep delivering mail to community mailboxes that receive parcels, so I’m guessing that deliveries at urban and sub-urban community mailboxes will remain unchanged for a while.

If there are any changes or news related to these deliveries I will an update on this blog.