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Rogers & Netflix

Rogers has decided to extend their Netflix offers to their existing Ignite subscribers, in lieu of the Shomi subscription that was included in some of their packages.

The offer, which will include a six month subscription to the Netflix Standard Plan, will be made available November 30th, 2016. And current members of Netflix will also be able to obtain a credit for this membership.

Unfortunately data caps will be an issue to some Ignite subscribers, who will need to limit their viewing to a select number of concerts, music documentaries and films in standard definition to avoid a data overage fee of $1.50/GB.

Existing Ignite users with unlimited usage plans will be able to view films in high definition but at about 4 GB each these films can burn through a 100 GB or 200 GM monthly usage limit quite quickly. And although newer Ignite subscribers have 125 GB and 250 GB monthly usage limits, they will also need to keep an eye on the amount of films, etc they view to avoid the data overage fees.

This of course depends on a person’s surfing habits. For example, i’m not a gamer, I watch television broadcasts on cable/PVR and I already own my favourite films on DVD and Blu-ray so i’m not expecting to stream a significant amount of content off Netflix. But even I am considering an upgrade to an unlimited usage plan because i’m a regular Youtube and Facebook user.

The success of this partnership will also depend on Netflix Canada’s content, that they have been promising to extend.

I haven’t been a Netflix Canada member for months so I don’t know if they’ve had some improvements. But i’m going to give them a chance for those six months.

Consumers Revolt Against UBB

An online petition against usage based billing has surpassed 80,000 signatures and Youtube, one of the services that will likely suffer the most because of UBB, has been flooded with videos on the subject.

Regular people, those that want to watch HD videos from legitimate sources, are furious. And as HD becomes more and more prevalent on the internet people will be forced to make more choices in regards to what they view.

Music downloads are usually fine as is music streaming and photography when it comes to bandwidth consumption. But videos gobble up bandwidth, as shown on a comparison chart published by the Vancouver Sun.

To remain under my limit i’ve decided to refrain from watching videos in HD online and will probably purchase the music videos I watch frequently on DVD or via iTunesicon. But of course many people will not want to limit their viewing to 480p, so I expect the internet providers to get quite a few complaints on this issue.