compact discs

Radio-Canada to Destroy 151,000 CDs!

It appears that the Montreal offices of Radio-Canada will be destroying over 151,000 compact discs from their library to save space according to Radio-Canada International.

These recordings will be copied to a digital format by 2019, just before the french public broadcaster’s move to a new smaller building in 2020. And only around 56,000 compact discs from their extensive collection will be offered to cultural or educational organizations.

When asked why all of the recordings could not be sold or given away, a spokeswoman for Radio-Canada stated it would have been too expensive and time consuming to confirm what rights were involved, although one has to wonder about this excuse because of the early 2012 sale of Calgary’s CBC music archive to The Inner Sleeve, a Calgary Record store in March 2012.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation sold 27,000 LPs and 35,000 CDs in that transaction and several other archives were closed since early 2012 because these were basically duplicates of the archive in Toronto.

Of the 650,000 compact discs contained at these archives in 2012, only 140,000 were “unique to one particular library” according to Exclaim. And some archivists and audiophiles are concerned about the potential loss of rare recordings in the process.

It’s a shame they couldn’t have simply forwarded Cancon recordings to Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa. But according to the CBC and Radio-Canada these were cost cutting measures…

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Bestbuy Says Goodbye to Compact Discs

Billboard has claimed that Bestbuy stores will not longer carry compact discs as of July 1st, 2018 and that some American stores may continue to sell vinyl.

I suspect they may continue to sell CDs online but streaming is still taking its toll on physical and digital music sales according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

Did Video Truly Kill The Radio Star ?

In the 80’s there was this popular belief that music videos would eventually result in the demise of radio.

Experts had believed that the popularity of music television would cause radio to fade away. And this prediction was so popular that it resulted in two incredibly successful singles based on radio nostalgia ; One from Queen (“Radio Ga Ga“) and one from The Buggles (“Video Killed the Radio Star“).

But it appears that this prediction was premature.

According to Nielson’s “Music 360” study, 48% of the individuals they polled claimed they “discover music most often through the radio”.

Youtube has become a major source for music in teens, 64% of the respondents having stated they listen to music on the service. But 56% of the teens polled also listen to radio.

It appears that radio is adapting and remains one of the main sources for music in teens, over two decades after the predictions were made.

Also noteworthy are the findings that compact discs still remain popular in some circles, 55% of the music fans polled having “identified physical CDs as a very or fairly good value”.

Half of the teens polled also claim to listen to compact discs. And 36% have purchased at least one compact disc within the year.

Three thousand Americans responded this online survey.

Cinram Files For Bankruptcy

Cinram, one of the world largest CD, DVD and blu-ray manufacturers, has filled for bankruptcy. This was in response to the loss of a major contract with Warner Music Group Corp.

Best Buy Reduces CDs & DVDs At Stores

It appears that Americans will not be able to buy many CDs and DVDs from their local Best Buys stores this Christmas, according to Investors.com.

This site reports that Best Buy are reducing the store space allocated to compact discs and DVDs to instead use this space for video game consoles and electronics like tablets PCs and netbooks this Christmas season.

Music + More

Compact Discs and other products featuring additional material will shortly be labeled with a new logo.

In response to a 2009 survey, the National Association of Recording Merchandisers have decided to introduce a standardized logo for consumers to distinguish enhanced products and products that contain bonus material from standard CD releases.

Most CDs with bonus material contain statements in regards to this bonus content but I’ve already run into limited edition releases that were distinguished from the standard release by a slightly different color scheme or small text, which makes some releases indistinguishable from each other online.

The addition of this logo will facilitate my purchases of CDs with bonus material but this is an American group so the logos will probably just start showing up on American sites, like Amazon.com, until the Canadian retailer and label subsidiaries decide to adopt the logo.

I’m guessing that Amazon.ca will probably be the first to introduce the logo on their site because they basically share their American counterpart’s database, followed closely by Best Buy Canada.

Both Amazon and Best Buy were members of the Deluxe Product Workgroup behind the new logo, along with Sony Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group Distribution and WEA Corp.

For additional information on this new standardized logo, click here for Official NARM Site.