DVD

Trade In Or Upgrade Your DVDs

Best Buy Canada and Future Shop are again accepting your old DVDs in exchange for $5 discounts on select Blu-Ray titles.

Future Shop is also accepting old DVDs and Blu-Rays in exchange for $10 off select 3D Blu-Ray titles.

This offer starts today and ends on November 1st, 2012.

Future Shop DVD Trade In Offers

Following its sister chain’s lead, Future Shop is also offering to take your old DVD off of your hands in exchange for discounts on a few selected Blu-Ray titles.

This offer will expire on August 16th. But unlike the Best Buy Canada offer several 3D Blu-Ray titles have also been made available at a $10 discount.

Trade In Your DVDs At Best Buy

Best Buy Canada will be accepting DVDs for $5 towards the purchase of selected titles from July 20th to August 17th, 2012.

I’m hoping to trade in some of my DVDs. But of course I’m only upgrading some of my collection. It’s rather pointless to upgrade DVDs with little to no scenic or special effect content like dramas and mysteries. And I’ve got quite a collection of music video compilations that will probably not be up-converted.

I will probably consider upgrading some of my live concert videos though, like Pink Floyd’s “Pulse” and Queen’s “Live At Wembley ’86”. But I also have a few that I know will require some serious remastering before being released on blu-ray.

BTW, Queen’s Greatest Video Hits, a boxed set that includes both Greatest Video Hits 1 and 2, will be released on DVD on August 28th, 2012.

Cinram Files For Bankruptcy

Cinram, one of the world largest CD, DVD and blu-ray manufacturers, has filled for bankruptcy. This was in response to the loss of a major contract with Warner Music Group Corp.

No DVD Playback In Windows 8 ?

Windows 8 will no longer include DVD playback capabilities by default and this function will only be included in Windows 8 Pro and in upgrades to computers that are equipped with DVD drives.

Microsoft believes that most of their customers do not use their computers to view DVDs and that DVD playback will not be necessary because most individuals who view films on their computers now download or steam this content from online sources.

Computers that are equipped with DVD or Blu-ray drives will likely include third party software so most consumers will be unaffected by this issue.

The MPAA & RIAA On Private Copying

The Motion Picture Association of America and Recording Industry Association of America have issued a join statement against the circumvention of copy protection for private copying.

On page 47 of their February 10th, 2012 statement the associations claim that there is no need for an exemption (in the States) because copies are available for purchase for numerous devices and “the inability to access a work on the device of one’s choosing is a mere inconvenience that does not justify an exemption“.

At the moment Canadians are not eligible to obtain “low cost” copies from most of the DVD/Blu-Ray programs mentioned in the American report.

We do have access to some digital copy titles. But these are generally included in the more expensive film packages (i.e “combo packs“) and many of these digital copy titles are time limited.

I believe digital copies with expiry dates are unfair to the consumer, who purchases the right to copy the material to a computer or portable device.

The ability to perform a digital copy is prominent on the packaging of these “combo packs” so it only logical to conclude that the consumer sees this ability as a feature and has chosen to purchase these “combo packs” for the ability, at extra cost.

That said, a nominal cost to perform a private copy would probably be the best option for the consumer.

Software is the best option for individuals who wish to make multiple private copies. But the entertainment industry should probably consider advertisement funded private copies to reduce the cost of a private copy after an initial purchase of a DVD or Blu-Ray disc by the consumer.

Whilst downloading a private copy a consumer could be shown numerous commercials for products or upcoming film and television features, like those found at the beginning of most DVDs and Blu-Ray discs.

Another option would be to offer Canadian consumers free downloads from existing services, thus promoting the sale of paid products on those services. There are numerous services available to Canadians including Bearshare and iMesh, who offer music videos, and iTunes and Netflix, who offer music and film downloads.

Some digital copies are available from these services and I suspect cloud services will become the consumer’s choice when it comes to private copying in the future, as it enables consumers to download or stream content on numerous devices.