music streaming

Piracy in Streaming

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry has released a report (PDF) this month and although it appears that the majority of consumers use legal streaming services to listen to music, 40% stream music from sites that are illegal.

These illegal sites, unfortunately, do not give royalties to the artists and also appear to be promoted by Google via their search engines.

This has become a concern because 85% of music consumers from the age of 13 to 15 stream music and video according to this report and the IFPI believes the issue is compounded by the popularity of music videos on Youtube, which “accounts for 46% of all time spent listening to on-demand music”; The IFPI believes upload services like Youtube “are not returning fair value to the music community”.

More people are listening to legal streaming services though, which is up from 37% last year to 45% this year. But the IFPI wants to obtain more revenue from Youtube, comparable to that of Spotify, whose royalties are estimated to be $20 per user, per year; The report claims less than a dollar in royalties are collected per user per year from Youtube.

The IFPI is also concerned about stream ripping, which involves the capturing of audio from streaming services.

This report estimates that more users are stream ripping, up from 30% last year to 35% this year. But advancements have been made to end this practice with the dismantling of YouTube-MP3.org earlier this month.

That site enabled its 60 million plus users to rip audio from Youtube videos but the Recording Industry Association of America sued and the owners of this site settled by closing it down.

RIAA had also successfully closed Sharebeast as well this month, a site that “averaged 14-16 million visits per month at its height in 2013” according to the Official RIAA press release.

New Streaming Service For Canadians

Amazon Prime Video is now available to Canadians.

The service can now be accessed via multiple devices and is free for Amazon Prime and Amazon Student subscribers in Canada.

Free trial subscriptions are available for both the streaming service and aforementioned shipping services – Click here for details on the 30 day trial subscription offered to the general public or click here for details on the six month trial subscription being offered to Canadians college and University students.

Bye Bye Radio

iTunes Radio will be no more as of January 29th, 2016. This ad sponsored music streaming service will merge into Apple Music at the end of this month. Click on the banner for details on how to subscribe to this new service :

Neil Young Quits Streaming

Neil Young has posted a statement on Facebook stating that “Streaming has ended for me”.

Apparently the sound quality of the current streaming services has caused him to pull his music from these services.

In another Facebook message he claimed “AM radio kicked streaming’s ass. Analog Cassettes and 8 tracks also kicked streaming’s ass, and absolutely rocked compared to streaming.” But he still has hope in regards to streaming, claiming that he would return if the quality of the sound were improved.

I personally think streaming is o.k but I still prefer listening to my own library of high quality recordings, that i’ve ripped from compact discs at a higher bit rate and stored on a local drive.

Delayed But Now Online

Apple’s new subscription based music streaming service is now online in Canada, after a slight delay. A three month free trial is available via the following banner :

Apple Music Streaming

Apple‘s new Beats 1 subscription based music streaming service will start in Canada on June 30th, 2015 and will cost $9.99 per month.

The service will first be available to iOS and Windows users but Android users will have access later this year.

Click here for the official press release, dated June 8th, 2015.