online movie rentals

On Sale At Staples

Staples is offering $50 iTunesicon gift cards for $40 this week, in store.

This offer is ending on September 11th, 2012 and may not be valid across Canada. Consult your local flyers.

Check Your Local Flyers

Walmart is offering $25 iTunesicon for $20 and Best Buy/Future Shop are offering pack of three $20 iTunesicon cards for $55 this week.

These offers are ending on September 6th, 2012 and may not be valid across Canada. Consult your local flyers.

iTunes Canada

The Gift Card Savings Continue

Starting today and ending August 16th, a four pack of $15 iTunesicon gift cards will be available at some Future Shop locations for $48.

Though listed with a webID, these cards don’t appear to be available though their online store. But you can buy gift cards online by clicking on the following banner.

iTunes Canada

Cloud Service Updates

Amazon.com has updated their Cloud service with a new system that scans and matches a person’s iTunesicon and Windows Media Player music library.

This enables users of their Cloud service to listen to music they have in their library though the service for $25 per year, without the inconvenience of uploading. But this service in unfortunately not yet available to Canadians.

iTunesicon, on the other hand, has expanded their American Match service to include films. And like Amazon.com they will likely need to negotiate with the film companies to obtain the rights to offer the service to Canadians.

Cisco Predicts Online Video Explosion

Cisco has released their Visual Networking Index Mobile Forecast for 2011-2016 and it predicts that mobile data traffic will explode because of online video.

The report predicts that in Canada “mobile data traffic will reach 219,897 Terabytes (0.22 Exabytes) per month in 2016” because more Canadians are using their mobile devices to watch movies, television programs, music videos and other content from sites like Youtube.

In 2011, Canada’s mobile data traffic was clocked by Cisco at 10,773 Terabytes (11 Petabytes) per month, “the equivalent of 3 million DVDs each month or 30 million text messages each second.” And their 2016 prediction would equal “55 million DVDs each month or 606 million text messages each second”.

Cisco reported that in 2011 only 57% of that year’s mobile data traffic was video. But predicts that 75% of this traffic will be video by 2016, at 162,179 Terabytes per month.

Canada – The Dial-Up Dungeon ?

It appears that even with the progresses we’ve had in Canada when it comes to the internet that some are still behind.

A quarter million of Canadian internet users still use dial-up according to the Convergence Consulting Group, a large percentage of which are in rural areas according to the CRTC. And of those who subscribe to high speed, only 52% have the necessary speed to download standard definition films.

Though 77% of Canadians are able to access services that are fast enough to stream high definition video content according to the Broadband Report, only 2% use these services. And it is obvious that it is because these services are prohibitively expensive that more Canadians are not subscribed.

Usage based billing has kept most Canadians from using these services to rent and purchase films online. And though the taxpayer is responsible for most of the infrastructure, we are still being told to pay more.

Perhaps the rates might go down once the spectrum management issues are resolved at the CRTC, which could result in the introduction “Super Wifi” into Canada’s major urban centers.

Unfortunately this wireless service could have issues in communities where analog television broadcasts still exist and digital television broadcasts are only mandatory in the major city centers.

The technology is also in its infancy, having only just been introduced in the United States in Wilmington, North Carolina.